Amethyst Talk Preparation Input


(Azriel Hoh) #1

Hiya, I’m going to be giving a talk on Amethyst in 1.5 weeks, and would like some input:

  • How Amethyst began. (ping: @ebkalderon)

  • What would people like me to include?

  • How honest I should be with my opinions:

    I intend to present Amethyst’s capabilities, but at the same time would normally be honest about the difficulties in using those capabilities:

    • Knowledge assumptions
    • Lack of documentation (that an “average” developer may understand)
    • Cryptic error messages
    • … (more will reveal themselves when I prep)

    How much honesty would people be happy with, as contrasted with my silence on these?

I don’t plan to talk about the organization / members, but will show some of the “what’s been done” from the collection @erlend_sh made.

I haven’t chosen a style for the talk – whether it’s for presenting Amethyst, or teaching how to use parts of it, or something else. Shall decide based on your input.

Yes I’ll post the slides for feedback before the day.


(Fletcher) #2

Need more context. Is this a technical talk? How much time do you have?

Know your audience; read the room. If they are highly technical, they will probably be most interested in the technical aspects. If they are less technical, they might be interested in our non-technical side.

Could you throw in a request for donations? =)


(Azriel Hoh) #3

ah, it’s going to be at least moderately technical – it’s a Rust meetup, but the range of people there include university students, devs who haven’t used Rust, devs who hack on Firefox, and devs who write parts of the Rust compiler. I’ve got an hour, though I like to keep the content to about 45 minutes, people are usually keen to ask about parts they are more interested in.

Hm, “Amethyst-technical” has a lot of detail in the game-dev space (apart from the usual goodness from Rust). Guess I can play with level of detail, and pictures.

Certainly :wink:


(Fletcher) #4

OK, so here’s some general public speaking advice I’ve found helpful over the years. You may know these already if you are an experienced public speaker; if so, disregard. =)

Three Things

At most, your audience is only going to remember three things from your speech. Pick what you want those three things to be and build your presentation around them.

Attention Span

The average human has an attention span of about 20 minutes for a topic. You have 60 minutes, so I think the 45 minutes and 15 minutes for questions is good. You may want to leave 5 minutes for questions between each of your three sections.

Control the Presentation

You’ll probably have that one or two people that want to have a 3 hour discussion. Those can derail your entire presentation. Watch your time, and be prepared to shut them down nicely with something like “Let’s talk more after the presentation, I want to make sure I cover the rest of the material” or something.

Ordering

  1. Start the presentation by giving a quick summary of your three things
  2. Present each of your three things
  3. End by re-summarizing the three things
  4. Take questions

Be Prepared to Say No Idea

You’ll probably get a few people who ask highly technical questions you don’t know the answer to. Just say something like “That one I’ll have to get back to you on”.

Things to Keep Near You

  1. Keep a pad of paper and pen so you can write down questions you need to find answers too.
  2. Keep a bottle of water or two nearby.

Don’t Say “Um”

If you are one of those people that says “um” or something similar a lot, try to minimize it during the speech. Don’t speak too fast. I find it helpful to keep a timer somewhere.

No Speech Survives First Contact With An Audience

Your speech may go completely off the rails. If the audience seems ok with it, just go with it.


(Joël Lupien) #5

One thing you will notice if you make an example game: 70%+ of your time will be spent working on dependent crates, fixing bugs or adding missing features in then. (Amethyst, nphysics, discord rpc, etc etc)


(Théo Degioanni) #6

Really? Are you talking about your nphysics experience?


(Joël Lupien) #7

Not only nphysics. From the moment I joined up to now, it was always like that with various dependencies.


(Azriel Hoh) #8

Here’s what I’ve done so far.
Navigation using arrow keys – press down for more detail, and if there isn’t, press right.

moved to Community category